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Schieffelin Hall

Ghosts and theaters go hand-in-hand, but none rival historical Schieffelin Hall when it comes to spooky activity. See for yourself on a USGA Tour.

Schefflin Hall

In Tombstone, Arizona, places of historical significance lie hidden in plain sight. When strolling past Schieffelin Hall, you likely wouldn’t suspect that this building is the biggest adobe structure still standing in the southwestern United States. 

But there’s more than meets the eye at this once legendary hall. Learn about the rise and fall of this iconic structure in Tombstone on a ghost tour with US Ghost Adventures. 

A Grand Start

Albert Schieffelin’s brother was the founder of the historic town of Tombstone. And with such a prestigious connection to the town’s origins, he sought to make Tombstone into a legendary place.

In 1881, he opened this landmark structure with the help of William Harwood. The iconic structure served as a concert hall, opera house, and grandiose theatre space. In a short time, it became a central fixture in the city. 

But as any focal point of a city wrought with mystery and murder, Schieffelin Hall was shrouded in scandal and engulfed in flame mere years after its grand opening. 

Who Remains After Destruction? 

In 1882, a devastating fire scorched Schieffelin Hall and tore through multiple blocks of Tombstone businesses and residences. The building fell into disrepair in the decades to follow and eventually became an abandoned building, at least for the living…

Not long after this historic landmark’s downfall, a tragic flood in Tombstone wreaked havoc on the mining town. It gave the residents no choice but to pick up and leave. 

But Schieffelin Hall remained, with no living inhabitants but the rats. Instead, legend has it that the structure became home to dozens of ghostly figures that refused to abandon Tombstone. In particular, the ghosts of theater performers refusing to give up the spotlight never left the hall. 

The Lady In Red has become a notorious figure, her ghostly crimson spirit often spotted drifting around the premises, waiting for a final bow that never came. Beware of mirrors if you enter the building, as on more than one occasion, she has frightened guests while peering over their shoulders and vanishing, like the flicker of a candle.

In Tombstone, Arizona, places of historical significance lie hidden in plain sight. When strolling past Schieffelin Hall, you likely wouldn’t suspect that this building is the biggest adobe structure still standing in the southwestern United States. 

But there’s more than meets the eye at this once legendary hall. Learn about the rise and fall of this iconic structure in Tombstone on a ghost tour with US Ghost Adventures.



A Grand Start

Albert Schieffelin’s brother was the founder of the historic town of Tombstone. And with such a prestigious connection to the town’s origins, he sought to make Tombstone into a legendary place.

In 1881, he opened this landmark structure with the help of William Harwood. The iconic structure served as a concert hall, opera house, and grandiose theatre space. In a short time, it became a central fixture in the city. 

But as any focal point of a city wrought with mystery and murder, Schieffelin Hall was shrouded in scandal and engulfed in flame mere years after its grand opening. 

Who Remains After Destruction? 

In 1882, a devastating fire scorched Schieffelin Hall and tore through multiple blocks of Tombstone businesses and residences. The building fell into disrepair in the decades to follow and eventually became an abandoned building, at least for the living…

Not long after this historic landmark’s downfall, a tragic flood in Tombstone wreaked havoc on the mining town. It gave the residents no choice but to pick up and leave. 

But Schieffelin Hall remained, with no living inhabitants but the rats. Instead, legend has it that the structure became home to dozens of ghostly figures that refused to abandon Tombstone. In particular, the ghosts of theater performers refusing to give up the spotlight never left the hall. 

The Lady In Red has become a notorious figure, her ghostly crimson spirit often spotted drifting around the premises, waiting for a final bow that never came. Beware of mirrors if you enter the building, as on more than one occasion, she has frightened guests while peering over their shoulders and vanishing, like the flicker of a candle.In Tombstone, Arizona, places of historical significance lie hidden in plain sight. When strolling past Schieffelin Hall, you likely wouldn’t suspect that this building is the biggest adobe structure still standing in the southwestern United States. 

But there’s more than meets the eye at this once legendary hall. Learn about the rise and fall of this iconic structure in Tombstone on a ghost tour with US Ghost Adventures. 

A Grand Start

Albert Schieffelin’s brother was the founder of the historic town of Tombstone. And with such a prestigious connection to the town’s origins, he sought to make Tombstone into a legendary place.

In 1881, he opened this landmark structure with the help of William Harwood. The iconic structure served as a concert hall, opera house, and grandiose theatre space. In a short time, it became a central fixture in the city. 

But as any focal point of a city wrought with mystery and murder, Schieffelin Hall was shrouded in scandal and engulfed in flame mere years after its grand opening. 

Who Remains After Destruction? 

In 1882, a devastating fire scorched Schieffelin Hall and tore through multiple blocks of Tombstone businesses and residences. The building fell into disrepair in the decades to follow and eventually became an abandoned building, at least for the living…

Not long after this historic landmark’s downfall, a tragic flood in Tombstone wreaked havoc on the mining town. It gave the residents no choice but to pick up and leave. 

But Schieffelin Hall remained, with no living inhabitants but the rats. Instead, legend has it that the structure became home to dozens of ghostly figures that refused to abandon Tombstone. In particular, the ghosts of theater performers refusing to give up the spotlight never left the hall. 

The Lady In Red has become a notorious figure, her ghostly crimson spirit often spotted drifting around the premises, waiting for a final bow that never came. Beware of mirrors if you enter the building, as on more than one occasion, she has frightened guests while peering over their shoulders and vanishing, like the flicker of a candle.